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Bidoun and “Revolution vs Revolution” at the Beirut Art Center

Ebrahim Goelstan, still from Yek Atash (A Fire), 1961

Revolution vs Revolution,
March 14, 26, 28
Beirut Art Center

In the context of Beirut Art Center’s exhibition “Revolution vs Revolution,” Bidoun’s Tiffany Malakooti presents two curated film programs around Iran’s Islamic Revolution of 1979 and Negar Azimi gives a talk entitled “Iran in Pictures: Social Suffering and Three Sets of Images.”

Wednesday, March 14, 2012 at 8pm
Ebrahim Golestan, Yek Atash (A Fire), 1961, 24′
Kamran Shirdel, Tehran Is the Capital of Iran, 1966, 18′
Parviz Kimiavi, Ya Zamene Ahu (O Guardian of the Deer), 1970, 20′

Monday March 26, 2012 at 8pm
Kianoush Ayari, Tazeh Nafas-ha (The Newborns), 1979, 45′

Wednesday March 28, 2012 at 8pm
Iran in Pictures: Social Suffering and Three Sets of Images by Negar Azimi

http://beirutartcenter.org

March 9, 2012

Bidoun Library Saturday Seminar: Samandal

Saturday, July 30
Samandal Comics
Sackler Centre of Arts Education, 3pm
Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, W2

Hatem Imam, co-founder of Samandal Comics, will host this week’s Saturday Seminar about this tri-lingual quarterly comic magazine.

Hatem Imam is a visual artist and designer whose work includes print media, installation, photography, video, and painting. In 2007, he co-founded Samandal comics magazine. He is board member of the 98weeks research project, the artistic director of the Annihaya record label, and a founding member of the art collective Atfal Ahdath. Since 2007, he has been teaching at the Department of Architecture and Design at the American University of Beirut.

Samandal Comics is a Beirut-based magazine dedicated to comics, with contributors from all over the world. The goal of Samandal is to provide a platform on which graphic artists may experiment and display their work, generating contemporary reading material for comics fans.

www.samandal.org

The Bidoun Library Project is up at the Serpentine from 12 July – 17 September. Click here for a complete schedule of Saturday Seminars.

July 28, 2011

Rayya Badran Selected for Bidoun/Delfina New Writing Residency

Delfina Foundation and Bidoun are pleased to announce that Rayya Badran has been selected for the Bidoun/Delfina New Writing Residency, supported by the British Council.

Rayya Badran (b. 1984) is a writer based in Beirut who focuses on the performative nature of the voice as well as on characteristics of aurality and music in film and video. In recent years, her research has explored melancholy in music. Her first publication entitled Radiophonic Voice(s) was produced in the framework of Ashkal Alwan’s Homeworks 5: A forum on cultural practices in April-May 2010, Beirut. The publication engaged two radiophonic events recorded and filmed in 2006 during the Israeli war on Lebanon. Rayya will be in residence in Winter of 2011 during which time she will research how popular culture, specifically Western music, is received, lived and later theorized among different generations in the context of Beirut.

September 14, 2010

Bidoun Library at the New Museum

New Museum (5th Floor)
August 4 — September 26, 2010
235 Bowery
New York, NY

The Bidoun Library Project at the New Museum is a highly partial account of five decades of printed matter in, near, about, and around the Middle East. Arrayed along these shelves are pulp fictions and propaganda, monographs and guidebooks, and pamphlets and periodicals, on subjects ranging from the oil boom to the Dubai bust, the Cold War to the hot pant, Pan-Arabs to Black Muslims, revolutionaries to royals, and Orientalism to its opposites.

Most of the 700-odd titles on display were acquired specifically for this exhibition. The shape of the collection was dictated primarily by search terms on the World Wide Web rather than any intrinsic notion of aptness or excellence. Searching for “Arab,” “paperback,” “1970s,” and “<$3,” we acquired dozens of books about the Oil Crisis, the cruel love of the Sheikh, and the lifestyles of the nouveau riche. A similar search for “Iran” produced its own set of types and stereotypes. We did not set out to find the best books about, say, the Iranian revolution; in a sense, we looked for the worst. Or, rather, we tried to look at what was there. The result is less a coherent group of titles or texts than an assortment of books as things, sorted roughly into four themes or units. Catalogues hang from the ceiling in front of each shelf cluster. Inside is a documentation of a selection of books from that shelf, in dialogue with excerpted texts and images from the library as a whole. The Bidoun Library includes a program of Iranian film, video, and television culled from low-fidelity DVDs and VHS tapes that circulate among Iranians in the Diaspora. The selection includes post-revolutionary variety shows, music videos, and other totems of middlebrow—unibrow?—culture. This is an Iranian cinema unlikely to be shown at Lincoln Center.

July 29, 2010

Bidoun Library at the New Museum, New York

New Museum (5th Floor)
August 4 — September 26, 2010
235 Bowery
New York, NY

The Bidoun Library Project at the New Museum is a highly partial account of five decades of printed matter in, near, about, and around the Middle East. Arrayed along these shelves are pulp fictions and propaganda, monographs and guidebooks, and pamphlets and periodicals, on subjects ranging from the oil boom to the Dubai bust, the Cold War to the hot pant, Pan-Arabs to Black Muslims, revolutionaries to royals, and Orientalism to its opposites.

Most of the 700-odd titles on display were acquired specifically for this exhibition. The shape of the collection was dictated primarily by search terms on the World Wide Web rather than any intrinsic notion of aptness or excellence. Searching for “Arab,” “paperback,” “1970s,” and “<$3,” we acquired dozens of books about the Oil Crisis, the cruel love of the Sheikh, and the lifestyles of the nouveau riche. A similar search for “Iran” produced its own set of types and stereotypes. We did not set out to find the best books about, say, the Iranian revolution; in a sense, we looked for the worst. Or, rather, we tried to look at what was there. The result is less a coherent group of titles or texts than an assortment of books as things, sorted roughly into four themes or units. Catalogues hang from the ceiling in front of each shelf cluster. Inside is a documentation of a selection of books from that shelf, in dialogue with excerpted texts and images from the library as a whole. The Bidoun Library includes a program of Iranian film, video, and television culled from low-fidelity DVDs and VHS tapes that circulate among Iranians in the Diaspora. The selection includes post-revolutionary variety shows, music videos, and other totems of middlebrow—unibrow?—culture. This is an Iranian cinema unlikely to be shown at Lincoln Center.

July 27, 2010

Abboudi Abou Jaoude Talk at 98Weeks

Saturday May 8th, 5:30pm
Bidoun Library & Project Space @ 98 Weeks
Jisr el Hadid, facing spoiler center, Chalhoub building, Ground floor, Beirut

Publisher (Al Furat Publishing) and collector Abboudi Abou Jaoude will present his collection of Lebanese and regional historical art and cultural magazines from the 30s to today. Examples of the discussed magazines will be available for consultation at 98weeks project space.

This event is part of 98weeks’ research, On publications, and coincides with the Bidoun Library on display at 98weeks until May 15.

May 7, 2010

Photos from the Bidoun Library at 98Weeks Beirut

Bidoun Library & Project Space @ 98 Weeks
On display until May 15, 2010!
98 Weeks Project Space, Ground Floor, Chalhoub Building, Off Nahr Street, Facing Spoiler Center, Before Jisr Hadid, Mar Mikhael

The 98 Weeks Project Space is open daily from 3pm to 7pm, except on Sundays.

April 30, 2010

Bidoun Library in Beirut!

Bidoun Library & Project Space @ 98 Weeks
April 17 – May 15, 2010
98 Weeks Project Space, Ground Floor, Chalhoub Building, Off Nahr Street, Facing Spoiler Center, Before Jisr Hadid, Mar Mikhael

Opening: Saturday April 17, 5pm, with readings by Bidoun contributing editors and writers Shumon Basar and Wael Lazkani and a conversation with the comics’ collective Samandal.

Debate: Saturday May 8, 5pm, with a panel including Abboudi Abou Jaoude of Al-Furat Publishers.

This iteration of the library coincides with the launch of 98 Weeks’ new research project on avant-garde journals and popular magazines stemming from moments of modernity in the Arab world. 98 Weeks’ collection of publications will be on permanent display at the 98 Weeks Project Space.

The 98 Weeks Project Space is open daily from 3pm to 7pm, except on Sundays.

April 13, 2010

NOISE at Sfeir-Semler: Installation images

Curated by Negar Azimi and Babak Radboy for Bidoun

With Vartan Avakian, Steven Baldi, Walead Beshty, Haris Epaminonda, Media Farzin, Marwan, Yoshua Okon, Babak Radboy, Bassam Ramlawi, Mounira Al Solh, Andree Sfeir, Rayyane Tabet, Lawrence Weiner, Alessandro Balteo Yazbeck

11th December 2009 – 6th February 2010


Vartan Avakian


Wall text, Walead Beshty


Rayayne Tabet, Alessandro Balteo Yazbeck and Media Farzin


Lawrence Weiner, Babak Radboy

More images at Sfeir-Semler.

Read review in NOW Lebanon: Make some NOISE Sfeir’s show challenges the idea of art galleries by Lucy Fielder

December 31, 2009

BubuWeb: The Red Army/PFLP: Declaration of World War

Sekigun-PFLP: Sekai Senso Sengen
(The Red Army/PFLP: Declaration of World War)

Masao Adachi & Kôji Wakamatsu
Japanese and Arabic with English subtitles
1971, 70 min
Co-edited by Red Army (Red Army Faction of Japan Revolutionary Communist League) and PFLP (Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine)

In 1971, Koji Wakamatsu and Masao Adachi, both having ties to the Japanese Red Army, stopped in Palestine on their way home from the Cannes festival. There they caught up with notorious JRA ex-pats Fusako Shigenobu (see “Jasmine on the Muzzle,” Bidoun 17 Flowers) and Mieko Toyama in training camps to create a newsreel-style agit-prop film based off of the “landscape theory” (fûkeiron) that Adachi and Wakamatsu had developed. The theory, most evident at work in A.K.A. Serial Killer (1969), aimed to move the emphasis of film from situations to landscapes as expression of political and economical power relations.

In 1974 Adachi left Japan and committed himself to the Palestinian Revolution and linked up with the Japan Red Army. His activities thereafter were not revealed until he was arrested and imprisoned in 1997 in Lebanon. In 2001 Adachi was extradited to Japan, and after two years of imprisonment, he was released and subsequently published Cinema/Revolution [Eiga/Kakumei], an auto-biographical account of his life.

Watch The Red Army/PFLP: Declaration of World War on UbuWeb

December 26, 2009

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